My car, toyota 4runner/1994

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What do you think?

posted by  Terrible_Tim

and the interior

posted by  Terrible_Tim

That it looks pretty much like your garden variety 10 year old Toyota... This must be a trick question.

posted by  vwhobo

Looks solid! niiiiceee... ;)

posted by  Unfedfat

real clean, looks good

i wish it would snow like that here :(

posted by  mazda6man

thats piddlyshit compared to me...hows 20 inches sound?

posted by  SuperJew

thats a little clean for there being snow on the ground. :?

posted by  Satty101

so maybe he just cleaned it..... :rolleyes:

posted by  SuperJew

That's a 4Runner alright... :?

posted by  BavarianWheels

I was jokin around SJ. But seriously, we never clean our cars when there's snow on the ground. just at the end when it's all melted we flush the underbody for about half an hour then clean the rest of the car. warm weather doesn't hurt either.

posted by  Satty101

If that's how you take care of your cars, I just named your proposed car club. The Racine Rust Buckets. 8O

posted by  vwhobo

meh. it's not really that bad. we will take them out for a quick hose down and a wipe off on the "warmer" days. but other than that, why bother.

posted by  Satty101

We had just boughten it so it had to be clean to sell.. and thanks for liking it everyone.

When we got it there was no snow..

posted by  Terrible_Tim

Nice grammar! ::flame::

posted by  BavarianWheels

He's just boughten some new grammar too. 8O

posted by  vwhobo

Oops, look what I just found;

Boughten, bôtn

Chiefly Northern U.S. A past participle of buy.

1. Commercially made; purchased, as opposed to homemade: boughten bread. 2. Artificial; false. Used of teeth.

American regional dialects allow freer adjectival use of certain past participles of verbs than does Standard English. Time-honored examples are boughten (chiefly Northern U.S.) and bought (chiefly Southern U.S.) to mean “purchased rather than homemade”: a boughten dress, bought bread. The Northern form boughten (as in store boughten) features the participial ending –en, added to bought, the participial form, probably by analogy with more common participial adjectives such as frozen. Another development, analogous to homemade, is evident in bought-made, cited in DARE from a Texas informant.

posted by  vwhobo

why am i not surprised its from a texan?

posted by  SuperJew

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