Old Skool

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Well I guess us "oldies" make no bones about how poor literacy is on various forums and it seems the world's educators are actually starting to recognise there is a problem. I know getting my children through school was an eye opener and as an employer I am consistently dismayed at the poor mathematical and language skills of would be employees.

So here is the article with some sample exam questions of 50 years ago. They are for year 8 students.

BTW : s = shilling, d = pence, £= pound. A shilling is 12 pence (12 pennies), a pound is 20 shillings

http://www.thesundaymail.news.com.au/common/story_page/0,5936,18118106%255E 2765,00.html

posted by  Wally

I agree with schools really not teaching to the required amounts, and a lot of the stuff I've learned about proper spelling/grammar/math is from my parents...

The curriculum today does need to be raised (at least for grade schools)...
:2cents:

BTW What does the whole shillings and pence and pounds have to do with anything? lol

posted by  chris_knows

If you read the whole article, you will find some sample questions via the links.

posted by  Wally

The link doesn't work anymore...DNS failure :ohcrap:...It might be back in a little while though...

posted by  chris_knows

There is a large problem here with the mix up of "your" and you're", which I corrected on here and was called a grammar teacher that who orgasms while correcting people's grammar

posted by  shev

The link seems to work now, but wow that's some confusing math with the money...It'd take a whiel to get used to it...

posted by  chris_knows

Yeah, I can't answer many of those math ones (mainly because it's not Candian/American money.. and for it to make more sense I'd have to re-write it).


Wouldn't the above question have 2 possible answers? If it's a regular year then it should fall on a Tuesday.. but it should be a Wednesday if it happens to be a leap year (which they don't happen to state which it is in the question...unless of course it's because the students were expected to know at the time which 1956 would be lol).

posted by  car_crazy89

It's an exam from 1955, so they'd probably know...BTW it was a Wednesday lol..

posted by  chris_knows

The train one seems like it'd come out as an irational number, 20 take 20 mintues off of 4 hours and 50 minutes, 4 hours and 30 minutes, it would take 4 hours and 10 minutes to get there with an overall average speed of 30mph, so there's 20 minutes left. 20/16=1.25. 1 minute 15 second stops. Eh, maybe not irrational. It's too late for this kinda thing.

posted by  jedimario

How did you go with the social studies questions about Canada?

posted by  Wally

I did, and didn't have too many problems, but I don't know how someone from a different country would know them...I mean I rarely see something like this on a test...I don't feel like giving long answers so...

a.) Halifax is important to Canada because it is right on the east coast, and the main area for importing and exporting goods to/from other countries.
b.)During the summer, the water is warmer, and the northern currents go south, the difference in the temperatures creates the heavy fogs in Eastern Canada.
c.)[This is the one that had me confused, because it might have changed but today...]The most industrialized region in Canada would be Southern Ontario, due to its many industries involved in the automotive trade, along with many mines, and electrical stations.
d.)The settlement of Newfoundland was because of the bountiful fish found there, along with the importing and exporting industries there, due to the waterways.
e.)Jacques Cartier was a French explorer, who was the one to go the farthest through the St. Laurence waterway.
Lord Durham was the man to create a report for the way things were going in British North America in the mid-1800's. He then reported it to the king of England.
Alexander Mackenzie was another explorer who mapped out the entire routes from the Atlantic Ocean to the St. Laurence waterways with great detail.
[Can't think of anything for the other ones]
f.)The difference in precipitation between Regina and Vancouver is because Vancouver is a maritime province, and near a large body of water, where the Rocky Mountains behind it cause the moisture to not be able to go past, and condenses over Vancouver, where Regina is not anywhere near any waterways.
g.)Canada exports hockey sticks and polar bears to Australia, and Australia exports Kangaroos and Didgeridoos to Canada :laughing:...

Sadly, probably more than half of those were wrong :ohcrap:

posted by  chris_knows

The thing is that curriculum was used into the sixties and seventies (although decimal currency came in around 1966) , before someone decided the burden was too great on sensitive little minds. A major part of both Social Studies A and B was learning about other countries. We were schooled in Occidental and Oriental cultures, British Empire/Commonwealth societies, even some US history, geography and demography.

Wolfe, by the way, laid seige of Quebec in about 1759 to take Canada as British.

posted by  Wally

The mix up with 'have' and 'of' gets to me. For example "He should of" instead of what it should be...."He should have"

Oh, and the good old 'hung' and 'hanged' gets to me too lol....maybe it's only the UK that say "hanged"? lol

posted by  Cliffy

No, our History teacher wouldn't leave us alone about that, it's hanged up here too :mrgreen:

posted by  chris_knows

Wahooo...it aint just me who says 'hanged' then!......The wife says 'hung' Grrrrrr....I'd like to hang her lol

posted by  Cliffy

I think theyre interchangeable. Never really thought about that.

posted by  shev

:laughing:...Do you guys talk about hanging people so often that it's gone to that point? :laughing:

posted by  chris_knows

You'd be supprised lol.....

posted by  Cliffy

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