Transmission Types

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Am I right to guess that cars with paddle shifters or sequential stick transmissions can labour but not stall i.e. if someone was driving a car with sequential transmission and stopped in third gear, would it not stall but just labour when they started to accelerate again?

posted by  snoopewite

Snoope, please restate your question. Me no comprehendo.

posted by  vwhobo

vwhobo, is it the term 'labour' that you don't understand or is it the two types of unconventional transmission that I mentioned that you're not familiar with?

posted by  snoopewite

I simply don't understand the concept of the question.

posted by  vwhobo

maybe its the "labour" part....i think he means will the engine flat out stall or just strain and not do anything in a SMG style tranny.

posted by  SuperJew

SuperJew, you weren’t far off the mark with what you said about the term ‘labour’. I think you Americans call it ‘lugging’ when a car is actually accelerating but very slowly because the transmission's in too high a gear.
vwhobo, thanks for trying to understand my question so that you could help but I’ve now found the answer to my question - when you come to a standstill in a car with a sequential transmission, it automatically goes back into first gear.

posted by  snoopewite

Well, sort of. Now that I've seen this post and can put it all into context, the question makes more sense. What you should have asked about is an electronically controlled, partially automated sequential transmission. Then your answer is most likely correct.

I know you're familiar with motorcycles and most of them have sequential transmissions. How many downshift to first when you stop? Not many. A sequential trans in a car is no different... Unless it's electronically controlled and partially automated.

Why were you guys stuck on my ability to understand the word "labour"? It was never an issue for me?

posted by  vwhobo

Why were you guys stuck on my ability to understand the word ]"labour"? [/U] I guess because we don't use that spelling over on this side of the pond. Nothing political :banghead:

posted by  lectroid

note that it was vwhobo who said that.....:read: :laughing:

posted by  SuperJew

vwhobo wrote: -
"I know you're familiar with motorcycles and most of them have sequential transmissions. How many downshift to first when you stop? Not many. A sequential trans in a car is no different... Unless it's electronically controlled and partially automated."

Motorbikes have clutches though. Are you saying that cars with manual sequential transmissions have clutch pedals?

posted by  snoopewite

You're assuming that because modern high dollar, high tech cars such as a Ferrari or Lamborghini have electronically controlled, partially automated sequential transmission (there's those words again), that all sequential transmissions have an automatic clutch. Unfortunately sequential transmissions have been around a long time and most are fully manual, you guessed it, just like a motorcycle.

Actually if you read your own question above, you've already answered it when you typed "manual sequential transmissions have clutch pedals".

posted by  vwhobo

vwhobo wrote: -
"You're assuming that because modern high dollar, high tech cars such as a Ferrari or Lamborghini have electronically controlled, partially automated sequential transmission (there's those words again), that all sequential transmissions have an automatic clutch."

That’s exactly where the problem with understanding was… only my assumption was actually going on an advert for a Citroen C2 VTR rather than cars that are too expensive for me to want buy even if I could afford one.

vwhobo wrote: -
"Unfortunately sequential transmissions have been around a long time and most are fully manual, you guessed it, just like a motorcycle.
Actually if you read your own question above, you've already answered it when you typed "manual sequential transmissions have clutch pedals"."

Yeah, I thought so.

Thanks again buddy.

posted by  snoopewite

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