Torque specification

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How do you meet a numerical torque specification when re-fastening the nuts and bolts on a wheel (eg, 24 ft-lbs)? Are there any special tools or procedures required for checking these values?

posted by  JaneiR36

You can buy a torque wrench, u set the value on the wrench and it will click when ur turning once its reached that torque. Those wrenches can be expensive though i wouldnt recomment getting one if its just for ur wheels. My auto teacher always said to torque all wheels to 90ft-lbs and 100ft-lbs for trucks and vans. You can feel it in your hand after uve tighten bolts for a long time when uve reached 90-100. Torque wrenches are a must when building an engine.

posted by  speedy266

Thanks! But... :)

How do normal people who don't have this extensive experience know when their wheel nuts have been tightened to that torque value? :(

posted by  JaneiR36

Pretty much on your personal wheels, you can easily tighten to 24lbs...it doesn't take much. Just make sure you tighten all of them evenly. You shouldn't have a problem.
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posted by  BavarianWheels

Thanks, I appreciate the help from both of you

Oh, yeah (EDIT), so I've seen concerns that you could make the nuts so tight that they break off. Apparently, the numerical guideline is given so you don't make it too loose or too tight. Should I be concerned about this?

posted by  JaneiR36

yes, u should. a cousin of mine tightened a bolt down too hard in the 3000 pipe, and when i was taking it out to clean things, it broke off, which pissed me off a lot. right now, im still wondering how im gonna take it out :(

posted by  Inygknok

Well wat i always did was compared it to my own weight lol. When i was in his class i was like 130. So it took some force to get em to 100ft-lbs. If i stood on the wrench that would be 130ft-lbs im guessing somewhere around there. But than again it also matters on the length of the handle its easyier to turn the further it goes ******ds. Feel how tight the bolts are by putting watever tool that came with ur car to take off and tighten the bolts and try to tighten it a little more and u'll get an idea of how much force u have to apply. Hope that makes sense.

posted by  speedy266

Most cars , the lug nuts torque will be specified to between 85 and 100 ft lbs

Consider the stud to act like a spring due to the mechanical properties of the steel. 24 ft lbs will not "stretch" the stud enough in the elastic range of the steel allow it clamp the wheel to the rotor ot torque plate. too much torque will stretch the stud into the plastic range (no clamping force) thus the wheel will be loose and worse of all, it is weaker thus will break.

Good concerns - A middle of the road torque wrench runs about $75 but is a good investment if doing much work

posted by  tbaxleyjr

my bad, wheel lug torque was specified as 76, not 25.

posted by  JaneiR36

put them all in finger tight, spin the wheel to get it to settle in the centre and thendo them up diagonally so that the wheel sits flush.

posted by  cinqyg

so by spin it around, I take it you're supposed to replace the nuts with the wheel still elevated?

posted by  JaneiR36

Yes. It makes it easier to "sit" the wheel evenly on. You should cross tighten each lug nut. Hand tighten them all in whatever order and then you can "spin" the wheel (the above suggestion seems fine)...drop the car and proceed to tighten each lug nut progressing to the lug across from the last one tightened. Don't tighten them in a circular order.
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posted by  BavarianWheels

very true - tightening wheels (or other multiple fasterners such as cylinder heads, intake manifolds,) etc in a circle can result in the part becoming warped.

posted by  tbaxleyjr

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