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Old 05-24-2005, 11:25 PM   #1
noob
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67, 68 mercury cougar

alright im looking into getting a 67 or 68 mercury cougar 1. because they look good 2. they are fairly inexspensive to rebuild. im only 15 now but i hvae been into cars my hole life. i want to rebuild this cougar and i was wondering if anyone had any advice or any ideas on were i could find one to buy in texas near austin
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Old 05-25-2005, 12:45 AM   #2
99integra
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I don't want to put you in a down but think of this. Lots of hours and money rebuilding, V8 equals bad gas mileage/high insurance costs, and why don't you get a safe and reliable car for a 1st one and then when you are older you can get a car to rebuild for fun. Get more experience before you dive into such a big project like this.
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Old 05-25-2005, 01:49 AM   #3
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99integra is right, unless......

1) You have a good shop to work in,
2) purchase price plus enought cash to finish $3K - $25K (depends on current condition)
3) lots of spare time

restoring a classic is a big step. I wish you the best of luck. Be sure to ask lots of questions.

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Old 05-25-2005, 01:51 AM   #4
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As to where to find them...

look at traderonline.com under classic cars
also try you local papers
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Old 05-25-2005, 02:06 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 99integra
I don't want to put you in a down but think of this. Lots of hours and money rebuilding, V8 equals bad gas mileage/high insurance costs, and why don't you get a safe and reliable car for a 1st one and then when you are older you can get a car to rebuild for fun. Get more experience before you dive into such a big project like this.

Those cars are some of the most reliable cars Ford has ever made. My dad and I had one that had a dead cylinder, was rusted out all over, and had one of the front wheels locked up. But god dammit, every time you tried to start her up, she would do it every time!
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Old 05-25-2005, 02:08 AM   #6
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There are no if's, and's, or but's about it. The kid needs a safe car with cheap insurance and because it will have an old V8, the gas mileage will be horrible. To sum it all up, the kid needs a newer car with lower miles, lower gas mileage, lower insurance and something that he doesn't have to put a lot of money into
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Old 05-25-2005, 02:22 AM   #7
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I've noticed alot of 'younger' enthusiast asking about buying one type of muscle car or another thinking they will go out and buy one and throw a few cool parts into it and they will have a great restored car. No matter what advise you give sometimes it takes someone actually going out and either buying one or trying to find out that nowadays it takes alot of cash and experience to build/restore an older muscle car. My first car was a 1970 Plymouth Road Runner. I remember the shock of what my insurance was going to be and had a tough time keeping it insured. My parents wouldn't insure it for me, that was my job and if I wanted to drive the car I had to find a way to insure it. There was no way I could have dumped big bucks into restoring it. Maybe a cool set of M/T valve covers and a painted intake was about all I could afford. I had to lean all that on my own. Even with the best advise, at that age it didn't matter, I was still going to buy it and make all the mistakes I did. That's how you learn. You can give advise all day but until some of these young guys actually get into the postion to buy a car or have one and start to price parts it won't sink in to them what it takes to do something like that. Life is a bunch of learning experiences and trial and error with cars is a big one. Good Luck with your search and I hope you find something to enjoy!!

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Old 05-25-2005, 04:35 AM   #8
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I guess i'm also gonna learn the hard way (if all goes well). Always wanted an older car, and i myself understand that its not gonna be as easy as going to the local auto parts dealer, getting what you want and putting it on. It all depends on who you are and how determined you are to start the project and keep at it to the end. If you decide its too hard/expensive or w/e you can always turn around and sell it for either what you paid or maybe a little more (as long as its reasonable). Sometimes the best way to learn IS the hard way and you never know till you try it. I think its a good idea and a great car. You could always check online (in your area), go around and check peoples yards, and look in the paper(s) (as mentioned). Good luck with whatever decision you make.
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