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Old 12-23-2005, 03:12 PM   #1
99integra
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First Car Buying and Safety Tips

Now I got some of these information snipets from a couple of sites, this first part is for the parent.


Tip #1: Make It Old, Solid and Bold back to top Shocking Stats In the last decade, over 68,000 teens have died in car crashes.

Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death for American teenagers.Some parents may want to buy a brand new car for their teen's first vehicle, however, it may not be the best vehicle to learn in. If you must buy your teen a car, here are some tips...

OLD, LARGE and SOLID
Think classic station wagon or full-size sedan with a small engine
Check the vehicle's history to assure that it's a safe and reliable
Parent's Tip: "Old, large and solid" may not be the words your teenager wants to hear, but they'll like them better than "take the bus."

Source: Safe Young Drivers, Phil Berardelli


Tip #2: Be a Winning Coach. Motivate Your Young Driver back to top Shocking Stats Car crashes are the #1 cause of death for 16-year olds.

Taking on the role of driving coach and sharing years of experience may save your child's life.To be a successful teacher, you need to understand a few things about motivating a student during driving sessions...

Check frequently to ensure that your teen understands
Keep things moving by giving your instructions in real time
Point things out as they happen
Act more as the co-pilot than taskmaster
Keep an eye on the road ahead of you at all times
Parent's Tip: Practice these tips in every driving session. And leave the whistle at home, coach!

Source: Safe Young Drivers, Phil Berardelli



Tip #3: Less is More - The Potential Catastrophe of Passengers back to top Shocking Stats Teens are involved in three times as many fatal crashes as other drivers.

65% of all teen passenger deaths occur when another teen is driving.Other teens in the car is one of the greatest risks...

Friends lead to excitement, distractions and peer pressure
Fatal crashes with teen drivers are more likely to involve passengers
Teens are less likely to wear seat belts when driving with other teens
Parent's Tip: Teens plus teens in a car equals disaster. Just say "no" to passengers for the first year.

Source: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration




Tip #4: Keep Your Hands on the Wheel to Avoid Distractions back to top Shocking Stats At 35 mph, a 2 second lapse in attention means you've traveled 100 feet without looking!

Teens are much more likely to be distracted when traveling with other teens.There are all kinds of distractions that can take our eyes off the road. Here's a way to help maintain your attention:

Keep both hands on the wheel while driving
Don't talk on the phone without a hands-free accessory
Wait 'til the next stoplight to change that CD
Don't drive with passengers until you are more experienced
Parent's Tip: Don't remind your teen of all the possible distractions. Instead, enforce keeping your hands on the wheel and you'll avoid most of the distractions that cause serious crashes.

Source: Safe Young Drivers, Phil Berardelli



Tip #5: Kissing the Windshield: Why Teens Don't Buckle Up back to top Shocking Stats Teens have the lowest seat belt use rate of all drivers.

This rate becomes worse when there are other teens in the car.Most teens grew up riding in car seats, but today they aren't buckling up. So what gets young drivers and passengers to buckle up?

Linking belt use to graduated driving privileges
Making your teen pay any fines that they incur
Teaching by example - always wear your seatbelt
Exercising your parental authority
Parent's Tip: Tell your kids to buckle up or walk. No negotiation. When they have kids, they'll understand!

Source: Insurance Institute for Highway Safety



Tip #6: Defensive Driving for Teens back to top Shocking Stats During the first year of licensed driving, 1-in-5 male and about 1-in-10 female 16-year old drivers will have a crash.
The first year of driving is a high-risk period especially for beginners starting at age 16. Inexperience, nervousness and lack of practical skills can lead to bad decisions behind the wheel. Create a home graduated licensing program with your licensed teen:

Continue to ride along and coach your teen even after they obtain a license.
Set a driving curfew (morning and night) to limit 'after dark' driving.
Monitor and limit your teens driving during inclement weather.
Restrict the number of passengers when your teen is driving.
Talk to your teen - find out what situations or techniques he/she has trouble with, then take them to a low-traffic location and have them practice with you in the car.
Parent's Tip: Teach your teen to drive defensively -- anticipating conditions and situations that increase risk. Watch for poor driving habits like not signaling, sloppy turns, speeding, lack of alertness or overcorrecting.

Source: Drivers.com



Tip #7: Boys vs. Girls back to top Shocking Stats Males are more than twice as likely to have serious crashes as females. But while the crash total for males has been declining over the past 20 years, the total for females has been rising.
More and more female drivers are taking to the roads as aggressively as males and paying a price for their risky behavior. Parents must teach both sons and daughters...

This is not a competition either of them wants to win
Parent's Tip: "Anything you can do I can do better" is a phrase kids hear a lot growing up. Perhaps a better way to word that phrase should be "Anything you can do I can do safer."

Source: Safe Young Drivers, Phil Berardelli



Tip #8: Learner's Permit Required? back to top Shocking Stats Only 32 states require a learner's permit before a driver's license.
Only 15 of those 32 require the permits to be held for a minimum length of time.
States with the most lenient licensing procedures have the highest crash rates for teens. Whether your state has a strict licensing procedure or not, you should always:

Set your own waiting period for your teen
Pursue a driving instruction program outside the school
Log plenty of practice time with your teen before letting him or her take the driver's exam
Parent's Tip: State laws and instruction are great ways to get your teen started on the road to safe driving, but what you do with and for your teen makes the most difference.

Source: Insurance Institute for Highway Safety



Tip #9: Parent-Teen Driving Agreement back to top Quick Tip Don't forget: As the parent, you are the boss! Driving is a privilege-especially for teens. The parent giveth and the parent taketh away.
To help your teen understand, take the time to review the issues and responsibilities associated with driving and consider making a Parent-Teen Driving Agreement using the outline below as a guide...

Issue - Curfew
Responsibility/Rule - Weekday evening curfew of 10 pm and a weekend evening curfew of midnight
Agreement - Coming home after the curfew will result in the curfew being set one hour earlier for one week
Parent's Tip: Treat your teen with the same respect by allowing them some control over the rules of driving.

Source: Teaching Your Teen To Drive Handbook</I>, Virginia DMV

Post Continued............
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Old 12-23-2005, 03:13 PM   #2
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.....Continued




Tip #10: We all need our space. The 3 second rule back to top Quick Tip Perception is about one second and time to react is about three-fourths of a second in ideal conditions.
Allowing enough space between you and other cars on the road allows for time to react in case of an emergency.

As the car in front of you passes a fixed point like a sign, tree or building, count "one thousand one, one thousand two, one thousand three". If you reach the designated point before three, slow down.
Increase your distance by one for each bad driving condition. For rain and fog you would add two seconds.
Make sure you drive in the middle of the lane to allow space on the side of the car.
If the driver behind you is too close, change lanes and let them pass.
Parent's Tip: Let your teen know that adding additional space between cars will not slow down their travel time any more than a few minutes. Better to arrive a few minutes late than not at all!

Source: Car Tips and More, Virginia Driver's Manual



Tip #11: Making Time - Make it Count back to top Quick Tip Teaching Tip: Develop a practice schedule with your teen.
Driving requires commitment and discipline - from both the student and the coach. The best way to demonstrate these traits is to establish a practice schedule and stick to it.

Commit to the 100 hours of supervised instruction (100 hours is only 2 hours/week for a year, or 4 hours/week for 6 months)
Make it routine--set aside a specific day and time for driving practice (Put it in your day-planner if you have to; this is an appointment for safety)
Go with the flow--when the lessons require driving at night or in bad weather, make adjustments
Don't cancel, reschedule--when you have to work late or something else unexpected comes up, don't cancel your driving date, reschedule it.

Parent's Tip: Demonstrate to your child that you are making this a firm commitment to their safety

Source: Safe Young Drivers, Phil Berardelli




Tip #12: Tapping the Wall back to top Quick Tip Teaching Tip: Have your teen tap the wall with the bumper of your car!
Want to instill some respect in a young driver for the forces that can be unleashed in a crash? Here's a harmless way to do it - just be careful...

Make sure your vehicle doesn't have a fragile plastic license plate frame positioned in front of the bumper (If you have any doubts about the idea, or are worried about damage, don't try it. Or, you drive.)
You or your teen pull into a parking space that abuts a solid concrete wall
Stop, and then move forward slowly until the vehicle's front bumper contacts with the wall. Even at one mile an hour, the sensation will send a shiver through both of you
Parent's Tip: Let them feel the shock of even the slightest bump; it will leave an imprint on your teen that will make them a safer driver.

Source: Safe Young Drivers, Phil Berardelli


Tip #13: Mirror, Mirror on the Car back to top Quick Tip Teaching Tip: Regular and proper use of mirrors is hard to learn but the pay off is big.
Tunnel vision and blind spots can be a hazard to any driver but are particularly difficult for a new driver. Teach your teen how to minimize both...

For the driver side mirror:

Have your teen roll up the window
Press his or her head against the glass
Then adjust the mirror so that they can just see the edge of the car
For the passenger side mirror:

Have your teen place their head in the center of the car (directly behind the inside mirror mount)
Adjust the outside mirror so that they can just see the edge of the car.
This is necessary even with convex (curved) mirrors where the image is distorted a little
Parent's Tip: Repeat that routine every time you and your teen begin a lesson to make blind spots virtually disappear.

Source: National Motorists Association



Tip #14: Driving Practice -- The Ultimate Video Game back to top Quick Tip Teaching Tip: Ten sessions driving is time well spent.
If your teen can spend 10 hours getting hand-cramps from the latest video game, he or she can spend ten sessions meandering through your local countryside or back roads, to develop driving hand-eye coordination. Anytime visibility decreases, have your teen:

Slow down
Access the situation
If visibility is only 100 feet ahead, you should be doing no more than 35 MPH. If it's at 50 feet, it's 25 MPH, and so on.
Parent's Tip: Build up to an hour or more per session. It will help your teen's mind and body become more accustomed to driving and build more confidence.

Source: Safe Young Drivers, Phil Berardelli






Tip #15: Who's Afraid of the Big, Bad Road? back to top Quick Tip Teaching Tip: Make it as simple at A,B,C. A Big, Clear parking lot.
When you read, you begin with ABC. When you teach your teen to drive, begin with A Big Clear parking lot. A large, unoccupied parking lot can be found in a myriad of places:

An office building or complex after hours
A shopping mall early in the morning
A place of worship any weekday
A high school parking lot on weekends
Parent's Tip: Try your own office parking lot after work. These lots offer plenty of space, and as a bonus, they probably have marked, defined areas to practice maneuverability techniques.

Source: Safe Young Drivers, Phil Berardelli
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Old 12-23-2005, 03:13 PM   #3
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Statistics say that atleast 65% of teens will get into an accident in their first 2 years of driving! Now put that together with a fast car and you've got hell on wheels. Remember, if you're son/daughter has a slower first car, before they pull into an intersection or pull out onto the street, they will have to think before they do it because slower car=needs more time to get to speed. Now in that same situation except with a fast car, they come up to an intersection or just need to pull onto a busy road, what do they do, they gun it and see if their car has enough balls to get out of the way. Now wouldn't that just make you worry about them a little bit more? Would you like them to kill/seriously hurt themselves and others if you get them a 300hp 2 ton rolling wall? No, because that would just be ascenine seeing that you would have to worrying about that. Now I'm not saying that will not happen with a slower car because everything is dangerous, but it will severly reduce your teen as just another statistic. Also factor in gas mileage, insurance, and of course safety, a solid, safe car is a must for todays standards. There are also chips you can put in the ECU that will record the speed, acceleration rate, and stopping G's and then you can view it on your computer. Its a small price to pay for seeing that you have a responsible young driver. I hope ya'll made the time to read this post and I hope it will help
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Old 12-23-2005, 03:49 PM   #4
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It's kinda sad, parents should really be able to tell their kids this kinda stuff on their own. They were in the same situations, they know what it's like. they should have some experiences they've learned from. I guess something like this wouldn't hurt though.
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Old 12-23-2005, 03:52 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jedimario
It's kinda sad, parents should really be able to tell their kids this kinda stuff on their own. They were in the same situations, they know what it's like. they should have some experiences they've learned from. I guess something like this wouldn't hurt though.
Shit and this came from a kid, sad isn't it
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Old 12-23-2005, 07:23 PM   #6
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Judging by the driver competence in this country, I don't feel safe with parents teaching their kids the bad habits they have from a position of lack of skill. From what I see every day on the commute, adults need more instruction than most kids do. At least most kids have an excuse...
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Old 12-23-2005, 11:46 PM   #7
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Let me share my parental experience on this subject with you. First let me say that I agree 110% with what ChrisV had to say. Most of the time, parents teaching their kids to drive is the blind leading the blind.

By the time my son was ready for his permit at age 15, he had 10 years driving experience under his belt both with motorcycles and cars. How you ask? He started racing motocross at age five and karts at age six. By the time he had his permit, he was experienced in those as well as trials, speedway, enduro, quarter midgets, bracket racing (cars and bikes), short course off-road and local dirt-track stock cars. So what's the point? The point is that operating the vehicle (motorcycle or car) was second nature, he only had to contend with learning to operate it in traffic.

Far too many people in this country take the privilege of driving for granted. And never forget, driving is a privilege, not a right. Driving is also a huge responsibility and in general it's not taken seriously by most people. There's a place for talking on your cell, watching DVD's, playing video games, eating a cheeseburger and getting drunk. That place is NOT behind the wheel.

About the only thing I agree with in the stuff that 99integra posted is the underlying theme parents need to spend more time and effort monitoring what their kids are doing. Most parents also need to lighten up and realize that their kids, especially boys, will be kids. I've heard aquaintances of mine tell their kids that they won't let them go to the local strip and run brackets because it's dangerous, but are then surprised their little preciouses got popped for street racing.

Back to my kid. His first car was a street legal, low 12 second bug. His first bike was a tweaked CB600F2. He started with both of these, on the street, four days after his 15th birthday and except for one speeding ticket has a clean record and no accidents for over six years. Of course he had a dad who towed him to the races, let him and his friends do burnout comps behind the shop and kept on his ass to do the right thing every step of the way.

Moral of the story. If parents took more interest in driving themselves and shared that with their kids, I honestly believe kids would be safer drivers. It's not about having a big, slow car. It's not about choosing here they go or who they go with. It's all about raising a kid with at least half a brain and a little common sense. Rant over.

P.S. The phone just rang as I was finishing this. My kid said listen to this. All I could hear was engine and tires spinning, so I asked WTF? He's putting new rear tires on his work truck tonight and needs to use up the old ones. Gotta love it.
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Old 12-24-2005, 02:10 AM   #8
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I completely agree with you Hobo, just trying to take the matter at hand and make a couple teens (like me) see it.
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Old 12-24-2005, 02:49 AM   #9
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I've heard that license tests in North America are easier than almost anywhere in the world, so why not make them a bit harder, and punishments should be harder for racing, and reckless driving...

I agree...parents aren't always the best drivers around for teaching their kids...
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Old 12-25-2005, 04:46 AM   #10
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First off, vwhobo, you seem like the best dad ever. Next I'd like to comment on licensing tests in North America (or at least Massachusettes)
Quote:
Originally Posted by chris_knows
I've heard that license tests in North America are easier than almost anywhere in the world, so why not make them a bit harder, and punishments should be harder for racing, and reckless driving...
My first licence test was not easy. I got in the car, and noticed the E-Brake light was on. I went to pull the latch on my left, and it wasn't there. I'm looking around to find the E-Brake release, and can't find it. I find a long stick on my right side with a button on top, and ask the cop if that's the E-Brake. He gives me the "you tell me" routine, and after a second I start to fiddle with it, and get the E-Brake released. He then says come back in a few weeks when you get some more expieriance. I was so pissed. He never even tried to observe my driving skills, hell he never let me take it out of park. I had completed all of my driving/observing hours with the driving school, and had driven hundreds of hours with my parents. It just so happens I never got to drive a car with that kind of E-Brake.
As far as making the racing laws stricter, well, they're pretty strict already. Doing a 0-60 run by yourself at 2:00am when knobody else is around
is considered racing in many (if not all) states. Keeping in mind that alot of states through you in the pokey and or/SEIZE your car for racing, I'd say the laws are strict enough. Want to keep kids off the street? Build more tracks. More importantly, make sure that Fast & Furious 3 never comes out.
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Old 12-25-2005, 04:53 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by giant016
First off, vwhobo, you seem like the best dad ever. Next I'd like to comment on licensing tests in North America (or at least Massachusettes)

My first licence test was not easy. I got in the car, and noticed the E-Brake light was on. I went to pull the latch on my left, and it wasn't there. I'm looking around to find the E-Brake release, and can't find it. I find a long stick on my right side with a button on top, and ask the cop if that's the E-Brake. He gives me the "you tell me" routine, and after a second I start to fiddle with it, and get the E-Brake released. He then says come back in a few weeks when you get some more expieriance. I was so pissed. He never even tried to observe my driving skills, hell he never let me take it out of park. I had completed all of my driving/observing hours with the driving school, and had driven hundreds of hours with my parents. It just so happens I never got to drive a car with that kind of E-Brake.
As far as making the racing laws stricter, well, they're pretty strict already. Doing a 0-60 run by yourself at 2:00am when knobody else is around
is considered racing in many (if not all) states. Keeping in mind that alot of states through you in the pokey and or/SEIZE your car for racing, I'd say the laws are strict enough. Want to keep kids off the street? Build more tracks. More importantly, make sure that Fast & Furious 3 never comes out.

It's on my list of things to do...right after I get a cell phone
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Old 12-25-2005, 04:56 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by giant016
As far as making the racing laws stricter, well, they're pretty strict already. Doing a 0-60 run by yourself at 2:00am when knobody else is around
is considered racing in many (if not all) states. Keeping in mind that alot of states through you in the pokey and or/SEIZE your car for racing, I'd say the laws are strict enough. Want to keep kids off the street? Build more tracks. More importantly, make sure that Fast & Furious 3 never comes out.
WEEEEELL....
The more severe the punishment, the more someone is gonna think about racing on the street. A track might not be an option for some people, but it doesn't matter. Anyway you can make a criminal more afraid of breaking a law is a good way to decrease the crime, and building more tracks won't do that(in the case of street racing). I think it would help some, but not nearly as much as a stiff punishment.
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