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Old 07-04-2005, 11:37 PM   #61
99integra
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zalight
Well, they aren't exacly the same. They are the same car and do have the same engine, but I know that the type R is better. Just don't know the exacts...

99integra? You are our integra fan, help a brother out, whats the differnces from the RSX-S and the ITR?

The Type-R could kick its ass, thats what the difference is. The RSX-S is a heavier/newer/shittier version of the Type-R. The Type-R is lighter and put out less hp but the RSX-S makes up for the weight problem by adding more hp. IMO, the Type-R could take the new RSX-S
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Old 07-05-2005, 12:15 AM   #62
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Originally Posted by 99integra
The Type-R could kick its ass, thats what the difference is. The RSX-S is a heavier/newer/shittier version of the Type-R. The Type-R is lighter and put out less hp but the RSX-S makes up for the weight problem by adding more hp. IMO, the Type-R could take the new RSX-S

What? I though the Type R uses the K20 with 220hp and the RSX type S uses K20a2 with 200hp. The type R is made in Japan right?
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Old 07-05-2005, 12:21 AM   #63
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What? I though the Type R uses the K20 with 220hp and the RSX type S uses K20a2 with 200hp. The type R is made in Japan right?

Okay, I don't want to explain all this so just read.
The first generation of the limited-edition Acura Integra Type-R was probably Honda's best image-builder in the United States, eclipsing even the exotic NSX in popularity among car fanatics. Based on the Integra coupe chassis and body style that lasted for the better part of eight years, the Type-R was first released for the 1997 model year in America and available every year till 2001, except for the 1999 model year. This so-called luxury-badged coupe is actually a barebones race-car which few will find luxurious. Initially available only in white, US-spec models were later sold only in yellow and black, while Canada got white and black. Incidentally, the original Japan-spec cars, sold only in the Japanese domestic market under the Honda badge, had rectangular wraparound headlights, while the rest of the world got four circular lamps.
All Type-R speedsters are externally differentiated from the 170 hp Integra GS-R by the unique paint, prominent rear wing, front chin spoiler, larger exhaust tip and the world-famous "Type-R" stickers. Other standard features include a close-ratio five-speed manual, Torsen limited-slip differential, a stiffer and stronger four-wheel double wishbone suspension, a lower ride height, reinforced body structure, ABS and high performance Bridgestone Potenza RE010 tires with small, but stylish, 15-inch aluminum wheels. Inside, the Type R gets barely-adjustable butt-hugging sport seats, and a carbon-fiber-encrusted instrument panel with amber illumination, along with a CD stereo system, power mirrors and door locks, and a boring leather steering wheel. Additionally, U.S. models get an aluminum shift knob and standard air-conditioning, while Canadian models don't get the funky shifter, but air-con is optional. The seats are hard and do not adjust for height and tilt, but offer excellent lateral support. The simple rear seats have a decent amount of legroom, being that the wheelbase is the same as the four-door Integra, but headroom is tight for taller passengers in the back due to the hatchback-like profile. Front airbags are standard.
Powered by the frantic B18C5 VTEC four cylinder engine, Honda managed to crank 195 hp out of a tiny 1.8 liters, at an impressive 108.5 horses per liter - a naturally-aspirated ratio bettered only by Honda's own S2000. All this power comes on at a skyhigh 8000 rpm, while the engine redlines at an insane 8400 rpm. Lots of power, and fuel economy is more like that of an economy car than a full-blown sports car. But the weak point of the engine is too obvious to ignore. With a peak torque figure of only 130 lb-ft, it would have been an issue on the dragstrip had the car not weighed in at only 2600 lbs. The problem is compounded by the fact that the torque peaks at a massive 7500 rpm, thereby making the Type-R no better than a basic Civic at low revs. To put it in perspective, even the new 140 hp Saturn Ion makes more torque, at 145 lb-ft. The Type-R uses a highly-tuned version of the GS-R engine. The notorious Variable Valve Timing and Lift Electronic Control system, or VTEC, came about from Honda's Formula 1 racing experience back in the 80s. The VTEC system uses three cam lobes and three rocker arms for each pair of valves, operating on both the intake and exhaust valves. The two outer cam lobes settings optimize low-speed torque and response while the middle lobe has a high-lift, longer-duration setting that optimizes high-end horsepower. The changeover between low lift and high lift occurs at 5700 rpm in the Type-R's case. At high revs, valve lift on the intake side increases by 0.9 mm, and on the exhaust side by 1.1 mm. The valve timing extends by an additional 10 degrees on the intake side and 8 degrees on the exhaust side. The engine block is makes use of pressure die-cast aluminum alloy and cast-iron cylinder liners for lightness and rigidity. Engine features include Programmed Fuel Injection, a rigid crankshaft with eight full balance weights, a crankshaft reinforcing bridge, twin-spring intake and exhaust valves, and a highly rigid integrated aluminum die-cast engine stiffener. The Type-R also has a larger diameter exhaust system. For best results, the engine needs to be strung to the maximum.
The Integra Type-R gives the driver quite a beating in city traffic. The stiffer suspension provides for a very harsh ride over uneven roads, and the need to rev hard just to get enough grunt to start moving is tedious. On the highway, the drone of the noisy engine at constant speed is almost unbearable, while compounded by the fact that most sound-deadening materials have been ditched to reduce weight. Plus, the somewhat large wing hinders rearward visibility. It becomes apparent where the car belongs once it is taken for a drive on twisty mountain roads. Neutral handling is the name of the game in tight corners, with little understeer and even a little oversteer when needed. The tail can be hung ******ds by lifting off the throttle, but it can just as easily be brought back in line with a dab of power. Tire grip is amazing, especially considering how relatively small they are, and the stiff suspension makes itself useful here, almost completely eliminating body roll. The steering is quick and precise, but a little heavy and lacking feel. A sneeze can set you off course. Needless to say, complete concentration is needed when driving at high speeds. And speed there is, and enough of it too. Given the scarce torque, acceleration is class-leading when shifting is done near the redline, beating the likes of the Celica GT-S, Eclipse GTS and even the newer RSX Type-S, while keeping up with the Mustang GT and Bimmer 330i, and beaten only by the WRX, Camaro Z28 and all-new Lancer Evo. Lateral grip is good too, considering the Integra's front-driven nature, but it is no doubt helped by the standard helical LSD and lack of body roll. Braking distances are impressive too, taking as much distance to stop from 60 mph as a Porsche 911. No wonder the Type-R has won the SCCA Touring Car championship numerous times. Most agree that the Type-R is a classic, especially when the RSX Type-S seems to be an all-round softer car.
ModernRacer.com

Drive the Type R like you hate it. Rev the engine to the wee of its life. The exhaust note blooms with hard-edged fury that like the S2000's sonorous wail is about as close to a sport bike's as you'll find in a production car. The Type R wants you, no, practically begs you, to run up to the 8,400 rpm redline. Obey it, and the close-ratio gearing keeps the engine in VTEC mode and allows access to all 195 horses. Keep driving like a madman, working the shifter like the action on a rifle bolt, and the Type R gobbles up curvy pavement like The Flash late for a doctor's appointment. Remember those sport seats you didn't like in the city because they didn't adjust for height or tilt? Now they pay unexpected dividends, gripping your body and keeping you clamped down. The brakes bleed speed effortlessly and are easy to manipulate at the limit of traction. Only the steering lets the Type R down, its precision hampered by heaviness in the wheel and a lack of overall feel.
Edmunds.com

During the early stages of testing the Type R, we discovered just how impervious the car is to the rigors of some of California's toughest racetracks. Even in the really tight sections, the LSD gave the Type R a fighting chance against rear- and all-wheel-drive contenders. Although the Type R is track-bred, the car is perfectly livable and exhibits the expected Acura level of refinement.
There is nothing refined, however, about the cam changeover nearing 6000 rpm; fast gets abruptly faster. Though a pacifist, I find this violence seducing, not to mention highly addictive. Thanks must be given that the wonderful VTEC vibrato made it past the NVH engineers. Regardless of my shortcomings as a musician, sliding up and down 8500 rpm worth of scale makes any pilot a virtuoso.
Sportcompactcarweb.com
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Old 07-05-2005, 02:02 AM   #64
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That has nothing to do with my question.. I said the NEW type Rs that look like the RSXs
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Old 07-05-2005, 03:11 AM   #65
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Originally Posted by CarEXPERT
That has nothing to do with my question.. I said the NEW type Rs that look like the RSXs

That was based on the new ones, read the damn thing
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Old 07-05-2005, 07:00 PM   #66
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Originally Posted by 99integra
That was based on the new ones, read the damn thing
I think he wanted to hear about the K20 that is found in the new DC5 Type-R rather that than the B18 powered DC2 model. Nice article by the way, very informative.
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Old 07-05-2005, 07:04 PM   #67
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Originally Posted by CarEXPERT
What? I though the Type R uses the K20 with 220hp and the RSX type S uses K20a2 with 200hp. The type R is made in Japan right?

The new DC5 Type-R (02-05) uses a k20a 220hp motor. The RSX-S uses either a 200hp k20a2 (02-04) or a 210hp k20z1 (05-up). The old DC2 (01 down) Type-R uses a 197hp B18c5.
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