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Old 03-29-2006, 04:01 AM   #1
67Coronet383
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Hydraulic Clutch

'93 Mazda Navajo 5 speed


Had trouble getting it in gear. Reverse - grind. Others, hard to shift into. Clutch was not fully disengauging. Jacked a rear wheel off the ground, clutch fully depressed engine running, 1st gear, wheel spun a good 10-15MPH.


I knew the system probably needed bleeding. No clutch free height adjustment on the vehicle, ect. I knew that the system had a lot of water in it to(not my car, dont ask how), so I figured I'd change the fluid while I was at it.

Opened bleeder valve, pumped clutch until all fluid was drained. Filled resiviour and made sure it stayed full at all times. Followed bleeding proceeder in hayne's manual which was pump 5 times waiting 2 seconds between each pump, hold, crack bleeder valve, shut it, repeat until all air is purged. Did that.

Problem: Air is "gone," push clutch to floor, crack bleeder, solid stream of brake fluid, no air at all. PEDAL still 100% spongy.

Crazy.

Talked to some machanics at a local shop and they said to let it sit over night and then try it again that it always works that way with them.


Well?

Thanks.
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Old 03-29-2006, 06:09 AM   #2
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I'm not too sure how a clutch pedle can be spongy.....brake pedle, yes....but not a clutch pedle, as this goes to the floor anyway lol....if your brake pedle went to the floor, you'd have a problem...
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Old 03-29-2006, 06:57 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cliffy
I'm not too sure how a clutch pedle can be spongy.....brake pedle, yes....but not a clutch pedle, as this goes to the floor anyway lol....if your brake pedle went to the floor, you'd have a problem...

Hold on...refrase that. If your brake pedal went to the floor and didn't engage your brake you would have a problem. I can put my brake pedal almost to the floor...and it stop really damn fast but doesn't start skidding unless its wet out
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Old 03-29-2006, 03:08 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 67Coronet383
'93 Mazda Navajo 5 speed


Had trouble getting it in gear. Reverse - grind. Others, hard to shift into. Clutch was not fully disengauging. Jacked a rear wheel off the ground, clutch fully depressed engine running, 1st gear, wheel spun a good 10-15MPH.


I knew the system probably needed bleeding. No clutch free height adjustment on the vehicle, ect. I knew that the system had a lot of water in it to(not my car, dont ask how), so I figured I'd change the fluid while I was at it.

Opened bleeder valve, pumped clutch until all fluid was drained. Filled resiviour and made sure it stayed full at all times. Followed bleeding proceeder in hayne's manual which was pump 5 times waiting 2 seconds between each pump, hold, crack bleeder valve, shut it, repeat until all air is purged. Did that.

Problem: Air is "gone," push clutch to floor, crack bleeder, solid stream of brake fluid, no air at all. PEDAL still 100% spongy.

Crazy.

Talked to some machanics at a local shop and they said to let it sit over night and then try it again that it always works that way with them.


Well?

Thanks.
They would be correct. The Ranger/Explorer/Navajo slave cylinders are essentially self bleeding. You may have actually hurt yourself by cracking the bleed screw. I find the best way to bleed the system, even with a new dry slave cylinder, is to complete your installation, cycle the pedal slowly several times and go to lunch. When you come back, presto, you have a bled hydraulic system. Just don't let the reserviour go dry.
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Old 03-29-2006, 04:54 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Golddragoner
Hold on...refrase that. If your brake pedal went to the floor and didn't engage your brake you would have a problem. I can put my brake pedal almost to the floor...and it stop really damn fast but doesn't start skidding unless its wet out
All pedals have a different feel to them, but generally speaking, if the pedal goes right down to the floor before having any effect, you have air in the system. I'm not sure about your case inparticular though as you say the pedal goes "almost" to the floor and then stops the car quickly....
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Old 04-01-2006, 06:37 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vwhobo
They would be correct. The Ranger/Explorer/Navajo slave cylinders are essentially self bleeding. You may have actually hurt yourself by cracking the bleed screw. I find the best way to bleed the system, even with a new dry slave cylinder, is to complete your installation, cycle the pedal slowly several times and go to lunch. When you come back, presto, you have a bled hydraulic system. Just don't let the reserviour go dry.
Alright, just thought I'd confirm it. Worked out nicely. Thanks a bunch.
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Old 04-01-2006, 07:11 PM   #7
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the last exploder i did (couple of weeks ago) i bungeed the pedal to the oh-shit handle behind the driver's seat while the tranny was out. once the trans was back in, i gravity bled the new slave, unbungeed the pedal, hit it twice and on the 3rd push, it was perfect. i don't know if it was just luck, but i'll do that next time, too...
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Old 04-03-2006, 02:20 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cliffy
All pedals have a different feel to them, but generally speaking, if the pedal goes right down to the floor before having any effect, you have air in the system. I'm not sure about your case inparticular though as you say the pedal goes "almost" to the floor and then stops the car quickly....

It means that the pedal goes pretty much to the floor, but doing that will make the brakes almost lock-up on dry ground (no clue why the hell it doesn't lock but it will after Friday when I put in th new Carbon Fibre pads that I got)
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Old 04-04-2006, 08:09 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Golddragoner
It means that the pedal goes pretty much to the floor, but doing that will make the brakes almost lock-up on dry ground (no clue why the hell it doesn't lock but it will after Friday when I put in th new Carbon Fibre pads that I got)
Dunno why it wont lock up on wet ground....but this sounds like either a collapsed brake hose or a partially siezed brake callipar....I'm inclined to say the hose more than a callipar though, as this might also suggest why the pedal goes almost to the floor, too! The reason it locks up suddenly is that no brake fluid is being pumped through tyhe system untill you push the pedal quite hard, this, in turn, lets all the brake fluid through at once and makes the brakes react more powerfully than normal
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