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Old 06-29-2005, 07:32 AM   #1
weaponX
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Millwrighting Relating To Auto Mechanics

I just started as a millwright/industrial mechanic apprentice and I was wondering how well does the mechanical skills of a millwright relate to auto mechanics. I dont mean to find a job as an auto mechanic, but to do something like restoring/modifying/building cars as a hobby. Its something I have been interested in attempting but havent actually had the money or space to actually do.
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Old 06-29-2005, 07:47 PM   #2
ppauley
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those two fields are much different, i suggest just jumping in on the car and learn by experience, i did now i have a masters in GM, could have in Ford but refused, and ASE master
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Old 06-29-2005, 08:03 PM   #3
weaponX
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Ok so how difficult would it be for me to learn to do being someone with experience working on industrial machinery and who is generally mechanically inclined but who has no actual automotive experience? should I go ahead and buy a car I want to fix or just buy some piece of junk I dont care about first and can expect to screw up?
also are there any specific books or manuals that would be of value in learning to do this? it will probably be at least a year before I even start so I have some time to research

Last edited by weaponX : 06-29-2005 at 08:07 PM.
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Old 07-01-2005, 08:26 PM   #4
tbaxleyjr
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some millwright skills would apply to auto mechanics.

Autorepair involves a number of skills which a good mechanic is a multi-skilled person. Where a millwright would be weak is in the area of troubleshooting engine control systems which in some industrial facilities falls under the electricians or instrument mechanics. Much engine rebuild work requires machine shop skills.
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Old 07-01-2005, 11:20 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ppauley
those two fields are much different, i suggest just jumping in on the car and learn by experience, i did now i have a masters in GM, could have in Ford but refused, and ASE master
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why'd ya refuse ford?
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Old 07-02-2005, 04:07 AM   #6
weaponX
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well at the shop we work at the engines we repair are much larger than any auto engine. We do most of the electrical and machining ourselves too as well as welding and many other things. Where I think I would be lacking is in automobile specific knowledge. So does anyone know of a good manual or text book so I can do some research ? I figure if I start reading up now I should have enough knowledge to at least begin a project like this by the time I have the money to do so.
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Old 07-02-2005, 01:33 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by weaponX
I just started as a millwright/industrial mechanic apprentice and I was wondering how well does the mechanical skills of a millwright relate to auto mechanics. I dont mean to find a job as an auto mechanic, but to do something like restoring/modifying/building cars as a hobby. Its something I have been interested in attempting but havent actually had the money or space to actually do.
Hi, would say decide what kind of car you want to work on an buy a motors manual that covers that car an read it , If your planing on this just being a hobby , millwright pays a lot more than being a mechanic. Have fun Slim
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Old 07-03-2005, 01:16 PM   #8
ppauley
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slimone has a good idea, and yes go buy a car thats a clunker and hopefully not computer controled 'just to make it easier at first' and have at it, thats how i started don't spend a lot of money on the car just use it for tinkering and see what happens. there is no replacement for hands on so have fun
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Old 07-03-2005, 05:04 PM   #9
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Any engineering skill will serve you when working on any car. As long as you have a workshop manual. The point is you know how to use tools, the resti s down to experience.

My engineering skills are pneumatics based. But I've rebuit 4 classic cars, if I did'nt know a particular skill I learned it. Just ask for help when you need it.

I'm on with car number 5 its only 12 years old but it's "modern" and I'm having to learn more new skills....but I'm getting there.

So go for it, you've nothing to lose, and loads to gain
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Old 07-05-2005, 04:03 AM   #10
BanffAutoSpa_ap
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i know it's not good to judge but the millwrights ive met were millrights for a reason, good with other stuff like carnival rides lol kidding but really it's a pretty different field unless your getting terms mixed up
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Old 07-05-2005, 08:18 PM   #11
weaponX
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BanffAutoSpa_ap
i know it's not good to judge but the millwrights ive met were millrights for a reason, good with other stuff like carnival rides lol kidding but really it's a pretty different field unless your getting terms mixed up

by milwright Im refering to what is currently known as an industrail mechanic. basically they build repair and maintain industrial machinery
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Old 04-22-2006, 08:44 PM   #12
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Thumbs up To weaponx

As you progress through your trades training, you will find that Millwright and Auto Mechanic are closer linked then you may think. Alot of the theory is identical, ie, hydraulics and pneumatics & AC and DC electrical are the same no matter what the platform is. Gears are gears no matter where they are found. Most important though is to have fun doing it. best of luck in the future.
TT
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Old 04-22-2006, 08:48 PM   #13
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welcome to CF.....

I dont think he's still here much
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