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Old 08-12-2005, 12:16 AM   #61
72firebird
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the whole point of sequences and gradual torquing is to evenly distribute pressure across it as your tightining it, again to prevent warping and other things like that
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Old 08-12-2005, 12:17 AM   #62
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Originally Posted by 72firebird
when taking them off or breaking them it doesnt matter too much on the order. but when it comes to torquing go in sequence and do it in stages. like first go around in sequence and torque down like 1/4 of its torque specs. then go around and torque it again in sequence this time at half torque. then the final pass you torque them to full specs.

Yes, thanks thats what I was looking for. Thats the rule. Alright so should you do that to things like cylinder head bolts too, or things like oil pan bolts? So let me see if im correct, you should always finger tighten all the bolts down first (on a cylinder head) and then stage them in order from the center to the outside?
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Old 08-12-2005, 12:18 AM   #63
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Originally Posted by 72firebird
the whole point of sequences and gradual torquing is to evenly distribute pressure across it as your tightining it, again to prevent warping and other things like that
Alot of people either dont realize this or dont care. Most people i know dont torque their wheels, they just give it a good tug/turn afterwards and their done.
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Old 08-12-2005, 12:20 AM   #64
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Originally Posted by CarEXPERT
Yes, thanks thats what I was looking for. Thats the rule. Alright so should you do that to things like cylinder head bolts too, or things like oil pan bolts? So let me see if im correct, you should always finger tighten all the bolts down first (on a cylinder head) and then stage them in order from the center to the outside?
Well when it comes to things like oil pans and cylinder heads, try to find the correct pattern either in a manual or on the internet, thats one area you dont wanna mess up, but otherwise i think your right.
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Old 08-12-2005, 12:29 AM   #65
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Alot of people either dont realize this or dont care. Most people i know dont torque their wheels, they just give it a good tug/turn afterwards and their done.

rofl its cool man thats what i do to mine too. im usualy too lazy to bust out the torque wrench just for the wheels. i just give them all a nice even strengthed tug to snug em up. but i never over tighten
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Old 08-12-2005, 12:30 AM   #66
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Originally Posted by car_crazy89
Well when it comes to things like oil pans and cylinder heads, try to find the correct pattern either in a manual or on the internet, thats one area you dont wanna mess up, but otherwise i think your right.

yea if something takes a certain sequence its usualy referenced in the book pertaining to that vehicle or somewhere on the net.
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Old 08-12-2005, 12:35 AM   #67
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Well when it comes to things like oil pans and cylinder heads, try to find the correct pattern either in a manual or on the internet, thats one area you dont wanna mess up, but otherwise i think your right.

Too right. In fact it goes further than that. There is a preoccupation with using mastics with gaskets that adds a couple of steps to the whole bolt tensioning thing.

First up CarExpert, most people just finger tighten wheel nuts. give them a bit of a snug with their out of the boot socket bar, drop the car on the dirt and give the nuts a good going over with using the foot pounding method. You should use a progressive diagonal pattern tension working up in three stages: eg 30%, 60%, 100% then give them a check after say 10 miles.

Back to the mastic. How many guys do you see who run a bead of silicone on their cork sump gasket? Answer = probably most of them and yet gasket suppliers and engine manufacturers usually only advise some mastic on the main bearing cap rubber channels. In fact cork gaskets, like head gaskets, should be sandwiched between very non slippery surfaces so the tension is taken up compressing the material rather than squeezing out sideways and distorting the oil pan. And once you use a sealant you add relaxation into the process and have to go around retensioning after a bit of time.
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Old 08-12-2005, 12:42 AM   #68
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Originally Posted by Wally
Too right. In fact it goes further than that. There is a preoccupation with using mastics with gaskets that adds a couple of steps to the whole bolt tensioning thing.

First up CarExpert, most people just finger tighten wheel nuts. give them a bit of a snug with their out of the boot socket bar, drop the car on the dirt and give the nuts a good going over with using the foot pounding method. You should use a progressive diagonal pattern tension working up in three stages: eg 30%, 60%, 100% then give them a check after say 10 miles.

Back to the mastic. How many guys do you see who run a bead of silicone on their cork sump gasket? Answer = probably most of them and yet gasket suppliers and engine manufacturers usually only advise some mastic on the main bearing cap rubber channels. In fact cork gaskets, like head gaskets, should be sandwiched between very non slippery surfaces so the tension is taken up compressing the material rather than squeezing out sideways and distorting the oil pan. And once you use a sealant you add relaxation into the process and have to go around retensioning after a bit of time.

So wally, should I put RTV sealant on my valve cover gasket when I put in a new one.?
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Old 08-12-2005, 12:47 AM   #69
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no. i wouldnt even use rubber. cork gaskets work great for valve covers. they soak up. just replace the cork every so often
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Old 08-12-2005, 12:53 AM   #70
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A lot of jap cars use rubber rocker cover gaskets. But you definitely don't use any mastic/sealant. Same general rules apply as with cork and head gaskets.

If you must use a sealant on gaskets, use something like Hylomar.
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Old 08-12-2005, 01:01 AM   #71
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A lot of jap cars use rubber rocker cover gaskets. But you definitely don't use any mastic/sealant. Same general rules apply as with cork and head gaskets.

If you must use a sealant on gaskets, use something like Hylomar.

Wally, why does my friends car(Ford Probe 94) has a lot of black, looks like oil but bumpy in his intake manifold runners when we took it out. His car was burning oil because we saw blue smoke from the exhuast. And when you take the spark plugs out, it is full of oil on the treads but clean on the electrode. Whats the problem wally.
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Old 08-12-2005, 01:06 AM   #72
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Wally, why does my friends car(Ford Probe 94) has a lot of black, looks like oil but bumpy in his intake manifold runners when we took it out. His car was burning oil because we saw blue smoke from the exhuast. And when you take the spark plugs out, it is full of oil on the treads but clean on the electrode. Whats the problem wally.

How would I know! Is the engine running up to temperature, are the rings ok, are the valve stem seals ok, is the PCV working ?
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Old 08-12-2005, 01:13 AM   #73
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[quote=Wally]How would I know! Is the engine running up to temperature, are the rings ok, are the valve stem seals ok, is the PCV working ?[/QUOTE

I think so, but the spark plugs are really weird. Listen, when I take the boot off and look down into the hole, you can see oil around the spark plug bore and when I take the spark plug out with a ratchet, there is oil everywhere on the threads but not on the part facing the combustion chamber.
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Old 08-12-2005, 02:14 AM   #74
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Well then maybe you have a leaking rocker cover, but that doesn't explain the oil in the runners, but then again 10 years is a long time and oil does accumulate.
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Old 08-12-2005, 03:16 PM   #75
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BOVs aren't mandatory.

No, but usually some sort of wastegate is in the system (unless you're looking at really low pressure turbos). BOVs are only one form of pressure regulating devices for turbo engines. Most stock turbo engines that don't have diverter valves will have internal wastegates to regulate pressure. Some have external ones, as do many aftermarket setups.
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