Car Forums  

Go Back   Car Forums > General Discussions > General Chat
FAQ Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 01-05-2006, 04:27 AM   #1
Aondor
CF Addict
 
Aondor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 452
V6-i6

What is gained by the V configuration of an engine what are the pros and cons?
What is gained by the Inline configuration?
I have to I6 and am curious.
Aondor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2006, 04:29 AM   #2
Pythias
CF Extraordinaire
 
Pythias's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Ohio, U.S.
Posts: 1,831
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aondor
What is gained by the V configuration of an engine what are the pros and cons?
What is gained by the Inline configuration?
I have to I6 and am curious.

I'm guessing you mean you have AN I6 and are curious about it?
__________________
"Though I drive through the valley of rice,I shall fear no turbo for torque art with me. Thy rod and piston, they comfort me."

"It is not the strong who will win, but the winner who is strong." -ROTK7
"You wrote "The World Doesn't Need A Savior" but everyday I hear people crying for one."
Pythias is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2006, 04:58 AM   #3
Bino
Written Off
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Phoenix, Oregon, USA
Posts: 844
There are pros and cons to both. A V6 is easier to package (shorter, but wider). An I6 is the most inherently balanced reciprocating piston engine configuration.
__________________
Build 'em Light and Wind 'em Tight.
Bino is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2006, 04:59 AM   #4
salimander13
Teach me, I'm learning
 
salimander13's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: southern cali
Posts: 1,072
are "I"'s the same as cylinders (I know its a newb question, but I'm going to repeat myself I don't have superior knowledge about cars.
__________________
salimander13 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2006, 04:59 AM   #5
Mathew
-BMW 3rd Year Apprentice-
 
Mathew's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Vancouver, BC
Posts: 2,053
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aondor
What is gained by the V configuration of an engine what are the pros and cons?
What is gained by the Inline configuration?
I have to I6 and am curious.

I6's generally run smoother, but are longer and usually (if not always) configured longitudally with RWD. V6's are more compact and can easily be mounted either way. Not sure if one generally produces more power or if it just depends on the engine.

Oh and obviously, V6's have twice as many camshafts as an equally configured I 6...so more moving parts. Assuming its OHC.

V6's generally have two cylinder heads. Unless its a VR6, but those are really more like like zigzag inline 6's. They share the head, camshaft etc. I really don't know why they called it a VR6, is much more like an inline...
__________________
Mathew is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2006, 05:01 AM   #6
pik_d
CF not-so-Freak
 
pik_d's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Eastern USA
Posts: 802
no, I means the cylinders are aligned in a straight line, V means that the cylinders are in two rows, and those rows are at an angle to each other, like a V. common angles are 45, 60, and 90.
pik_d is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2006, 05:01 AM   #7
Nissan_Altima
Biggest anti-post whore
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Philadelphia, PA
Posts: 760
In general, I6's are very smooth and have proven power and excellent durability. Lotís of big rigs run turbo diesel I6 engines to haul tons of weight for unheard amount of mileages. The V6 however (I'm guessing more popular too) is much more compact and easier to "package" into a car.
Nissan_Altima is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2006, 05:02 AM   #8
newyorker
MXman
 
newyorker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Philly
Posts: 5,291
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nissan_Altima
In general, I6's are very smooth and have proven power and excellent durability. Lotís of big rigs run turbo diesel I6 engines to haul tons of weight for unheard amount of mileages. The V6 however (I'm guessing more popular too) is much more compact and easier to "package" into a car.
Is this researched information or made up? No pun intended I just wana see if this is true or not.
__________________
04 Mazdaspeed Miata #2373/4000: IHI, BBS, Harddog, Flyin'Miata.

newyorker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2006, 05:06 AM   #9
Mathew
-BMW 3rd Year Apprentice-
 
Mathew's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Vancouver, BC
Posts: 2,053
Quote:
Originally Posted by newyorker
Is this researched information or made up? No pun intended I just wana see if this is true or not.

It sounds right to me...
__________________
Mathew is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2006, 07:55 AM   #10
philo
CF Newbie
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Elmira, NY
Posts: 19
I6's are very smooth running. I have an I5 in my Colorado pickup, and it is also smooth, but that is because it has a balance shaft to make up for the 'missing' cylinder. It also has DOHC's and four valves/cylinder.

V6's work well in front wheel drive cars because the length of the engine is less than an inline six cylinder engine, so it fits better into the car. But there is at least one inline six being put into a front wheel drive car - not sure of the name, maybe KIA.
philo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2006, 08:06 AM   #11
Mk3golfer
CF Enthusiast
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Kent UK
Posts: 107
I stands for Inline... as in Inline6 etc... all engines are different, best way to find out the difference is to drive different kinds... I prefer I6, as i love BMWs....
__________________
It was broken when you gave it to me...
Mk3golfer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2006, 12:37 PM   #12
Wally
I Know More Than You
 
Wally's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Oz
Posts: 2,564
Six pot logs balanced? ....who cares if they are supposed to run smooth all by themselves, there's plenty of ways to make any engine run smooth. What about the amount of reciprocating mass and torsional twist that a log has in comparison to a bent motor?

Personally I would go a Ford SOHC XR6 4.0 log over a Buick 3.8 and it's successor anyday.
__________________
"She gave me a look only a mother could give a child."
Wally is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2006, 03:14 PM   #13
TheFieroKid
CF Freak
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 578
Simply put, the V config is great if you want to go fast quickly, the I config is great if you want lots of torque.

V pros, can get you up to speed faster then any other config... that’s about it.
V cons, doesn’t last as long as the boxer or I config... basically during each combustion stroke (this is the power stroke) after the explosion in side the cylinder the piston is forced against the cylinder wall before it is forced down, over time (200k or so) the cylinder walls wear out.

I pros, lots of low end torque, lasts longer.
I cons, take up more room, not good for racing.

Now the best engines the boxer engines, these are also known as horizontally apposed engines.
That’s an engine you want to go with... for one reason or another (My engines instructor went into depth on this subject...but I don’t have neither the time nor the patience to write it all down) you get the best of both worlds. During the power stroke the piston isn’t forced into the cylinder wall, its got the best balance of all the designs, great torque and very quick acceleration.

Now if you don’t believe me... ask your self, why does porshe and other car manufactures put the boxer engine in their best cars?
__________________
TheFieroKid is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2006, 03:19 PM   #14
TheFieroKid
CF Freak
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 578
Quote:
Originally Posted by philo
I6's are very smooth running. I have an I5 in my Colorado pickup, and it is also smooth, but that is because it has a balance shaft to make up for the 'missing' cylinder. It also has DOHC's and four valves/cylinder.

there’s no need to make up for the missing cylinder your running an inline config... which means you can have any number of cylinders.
The only reason V configs are ran in even numbers is for balancing issues within the block its self. Basically two pistons have to be going down at the same time on opposite sides of the cylinder block or your engine will rattle all over the place.
In an Inline config this isn’t an issue since all pistons are moving up and down, not on angles like in a V config.

My cousins old Volvo (similar to the one I wanted) had an I5… not great on gas but ill be damned if the car didn’t last well over 300k, and is still going.
__________________
TheFieroKid is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2006, 05:08 PM   #15
Bino
Written Off
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Phoenix, Oregon, USA
Posts: 844
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheFieroKid
thereís no need to make up for the missing cylinder your running an inline config... which means you can have any number of cylinders.
The only reason V configs are ran in even numbers is for balancing issues within the block its self. Basically two pistons have to be going down at the same time on opposite sides of the cylinder block or your engine will rattle all over the place.
In an Inline config this isnít an issue since all pistons are moving up and down, not on angles like in a V config.

My cousins old Volvo (similar to the one I wanted) had an I5Ö not great on gas but ill be damned if the car didnít last well over 300k, and is still going.

Honda makes a V5 racing motorcycle... RC 211V, do a quick search.
__________________
Build 'em Light and Wind 'em Tight.
Bino is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Forum Jump



All times are GMT +1. The time now is 05:56 PM.

Powered by vBulletin Version 3.5.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright © 2002 - 2011 Car Forums. All rights reserved.