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Old 02-01-2006, 08:35 PM   #1
silvia_star
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what is obd1?

what is obd1?
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Old 02-01-2006, 08:42 PM   #2
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A quick google would have done it, but OBD-I is use for cars pre-1995, where On board diagnostics (OBD) technology determines whether there is a malfunction in the components that control exhaust/emissions through the vehicles computer system, the newer one is OBD-II which is used for cars 1996+.

The main difference between OBD I is that it is less restrictive (in diagnosing) than OBD II, but one can be converted to the other--Skunk2 had some adapters for that I think...

BTW this took about 5 minutes of searching
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Old 02-01-2006, 10:26 PM   #3
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actually,.. they have OBD3 now. - i think.
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Old 02-01-2006, 10:53 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 3geclipse13087
actually,.. they have OBD3 now. - i think.
It's been made, but I'm pretty sure it's not being put in any cars yet:
Quote:
The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) seems bent on becoming the country’s most intrusive government agency, a distinction most agree is currently held by the Internal Revenue Service.

In the name of reducing auto emissions, EPA is said to be “improving” the on-board pollution control system it requires under the hoods of American vehicles. While unlikely to improve air quality, the new Big Brother devices will make it much easier for EPA to know who’s driving what vehicles, and where they’re going.


The Little Black Box . . .

The heart of EPA’s on-board pollution control system is a collection of sensors and computers called OBD2 (OBD1 if your car is more than a couple years old). It senses a wide variety of engine problems that can result in the emission of pollutants such as ozone. When an OBD senses that a vehicle’s engine has developed a pollution-generating defect, it turns on a warning light that instructs the driver to have the vehicle repaired.

The OBD does not, however, tell the driver what is wrong. Only a qualified mechanic, with a scanning device that can be connected to the vehicle’s computer (for an average charge of between $50 and $60), can make that determination. Often--how often no one at EPA knows--the OBD “senses” a problem when none exists.

Though OBD devices have been installed in cars for years, at an average cost of $300 per vehicle, EPA has never conducted a real-world study of their reliability. According to Ed Gardetto of the EPA’s Emissions Program Group, the agency only recently began a two-year study of 200 vehicles to determine how well OBD2 devices function in detecting pollution-causing defects.

Bob Brooks, editor of Ward’s Engine Update, says the study might not be necessary “if EPA had a better relationship with the repair industry.” “The repair trade could tell EPA most of what it what it needs to know at little cost,” he adds.


. . . That Could Become a Spy

What may replace OBD2 is, naturally, OBD3. EPA officials flatly state they are not working on such a device, nor are they interested in doing so. Semantically, the “not working on” is correct. OBD3 is being developed by the California Air Resources Board (CARB), which has already let a contract for the device’s preliminary development. That said, sources at EPA acknowledge they are “following California’s development of OBD3.”

When asked, both EPA and CARB officials cited only one difference between OBD3 and the unproven OBD2: the former includes a transponder--a tiny radio transmitter that relays emissions information about your vehicle, including its Vehicle Identification Number (VIN), to remote receiving stations.

The purpose of OBD3, according to CARB’s Allan Lyons, is to reduce the number of costly vehicle emissions tests. In California, for example, every vehicle is tested for emissions every two years. Over 75 percent pass the test. Had it been known in advance that their pollution emissions were within permissible limits, those cars would not have had to be tested.

With OBD3 transponders transmitting emissions data to remote sensing stations, government officials would always know which vehicles are emitting an excess of pollutants and which are not.

Sounds good . . . except that OBD3 is identical, in all respects but the transponder, to OBD2--a system about which many questions remain unanswered. Moreover, OBD3 positively identifies every vehicle and can easily have sensors added to it to determine your vehicle’s speed and location. While all this sounds a little paranoid, even Lyons admits there are Big Brother concerns. “You can’t even discuss the subject without the issue of Big Brother coming up,” he acknowledges.

http://www.heartland.org/Article.cfm?artId=13847

The whole Big Brother thing does freak me out though...tracking you, I know it's been discussed in a couple of recent threads...
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